snapshots of mexico, literal and figurative


God: Thou shalt not hoard
January 17, 2009, 9:00 am
Filed under: Photo, Short | Tags: , ,

Throughout much of Mexico’s history, Zacatecas was a source of unfathomable riches thanks to its prodigious mines.  Also throughout Mexico’s history, these riches attracted daring and ruthless bandits willing to risk their lives for the precious metals extracted from the city’s mountains.  Finally, once again throughout much of Mexico’s history, the Catholic Church was the largest, richest, and most powerful institution in the country.  Put these together and what do you get?   A very very wealthy, very very nervous clergy in the Silver City.

In the town there was a large, incredibly wealthy monastery (what ever happened to vows of poverty?).  The monks who lived there were scared that they would be robbed and their vast collection of gold and silver would be stolen, so they hid it away, keeping its location a secret among themselves.  Perhaps they should have used some of this money on building maintenance as one day the roof of the monastery collapsed, killing every last one and leaving the treasure lost forever.

The ghosts of these monks still haunt Zacatecas, encouraging young Zacatecanos to search for their riches, but instead luring them to their deaths.

So to recap, greedy paranoid monks are haunting and killing people hundreds of years after their untimely deaths.  Not the Church’s finest bunch…

Remains of the collapsed monastery

Remains of the collapsed monastery

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